Find us on: University of East Anglia on Facebook Follow University of East Anglia news on Twitter University of East Anglia's YouTube channel

Thursday history lectures launched

Wed, 14 Feb 2007

A new series of public lectures focussing on the unique cultural history of East Anglia is launched at the University of East Anglia.

Organised by the Centre of East Anglian Studies at UEA, the lectures focus on the rich cultural history of the region.

The free talks begin on Thursday February 15 and take place every Thursday. These well-illustrated talks are designed for the general public. They look a the surviving but often neglected material evidence for a wide range of cultural activities – from medieval drama in the region, to the history of Norwich City Library.

“This year the aim is to introduce people to what recently has become an exciting new area of historical research: history through the surviving material evidence. In particular we will be focusing on the region’s unique cultural history,” said CEAS director Dr Victor Morgan. “I would encourage anyone who is inquisitive about the past to come along. Hopefully, we will go some way to satisfying their curiosity.”

The first lecture takes place on Thursday February 15 when Julian Luxford of St Andrews University discusses 'An East Anglian aesthetic: flint flushwork and its architectural context'.

On Thursday February 22, the independent scholar Martial Rose explores 'Reflections of medieval drama in East Anglia in the art forms of the period'.

CEAS director Dr Victor Morgan asks 'Did the renaissance reach East Anglia?' in his lecture on Thursday March 1.

The series concludes on Thursday March 8 with 'Solomon’s treasure house: Norwich City Library in the life of its users' by Clive Wilkins-Jones of Norfolk Heritage Library.

All lectures take place at 7pm in Lecture Theatre 2 at the University of East Anglia. All are welcome and admission if free.
QR code for Thursday history lectures launched

Send this page to your mobile phone by scanning this code using a 2D barcode (QR Code) reader. These can be installed on most modern Smart Phones.