Biography

Duncan, a Senior Fellow of the Higher Education Academy, is primarily a labour economist. Whilst retaining his commitment to this area of expertise, much of his recent research has been considerably less conventional in form. Over the past few years he has been preoccupied with transgressing a few ‘economic borderlines’, and he has experimented with the application of labour theory to increasingly diverse topics, deemed by many to be non-traditional and lying outside the accepted boundaries of the discipline. Examples of current research projects that reflect this more eclectic and cross-disciplinary approach include the linking of economic psychology to the modelling of housing demand, the application of firm organisation theory to skill shortages, assessing the impact of military expenditure on labour demand and the investigation of the importance of labour market inefficiency on financial sector costs.

Duncan is active in pedagogical research into the student experience and has published the following teaching related output for the Economics profession: "Economics is the study of scarcity: Avoiding the Various Means to Disengage Student Interest..." (An Economics Network Case Study into an Applied Economics module, providing a toolkit which demonstrates how a curriculum can be designed which further enhances the student experience); "Assessment Design and Methods" (A chapter for the Economic Network's Handbook for Economics Lecturers which considers alternative assessment methods - seminar assessments, reflective learning exercises, project-based learning, group assessment, mentoring, peer group support, multi-stage dissertation-based assessment, online discussion boards, alternatives to traditional essays- that are used to further facilitate the upskilling of students).

He is a Senior Editor for Cogent Economics & Finance. He is also the Chair of Ecuator.

All Publications

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Cook, S., Watson, D.

(2017)

Volatility in the housing market: Evidence on risk and return in the London sub-market,

in Quantitative Finance and Economics

1

(3)

pp. 272-287

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Cook, S., Watson, D.

(2017)

Mean and variance equation dynamics: Time deformation, GARCH and a robust analysis of the London housing market,

in International Journal of Finance & Economics

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(E-pub ahead of print)


Cook, S., Watson, D.

(2017)

Revisiting the returns-volume relationship: Time variation, alternative measures and the financial crisis,

in Physica A: Statistical Mechanics and Its Applications

470

pp. 228–235

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Webb, R., Watson, D., Cook, S., Arico, F.

(2017)

Graduate views on access to higher education: is it really a case of pulling up the ladder?,

in Studies in Higher Education

42

(3)

pp. 504-518

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Cook, S., Watson, D.

(2016)

A new perspective on the ripple effect in the UK housing market: Comovement, cyclical subsamples and alternative indices,

in Urban Studies

53

(14)

pp. 3048-3062

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Watson, D., Parker, L.

(2016)

The hullaballoo over e-learning? Technology and pluralism in economics,

in Cogent Economics & Finance

4

(1)

article no. 1159813

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Cook, S., Watson, D.

(2014)

A re-examination of the opportunity and motivation effects underlying criminal activity,

in Criminology and Criminal Justice

14

(4)

pp. 458-469

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Webb, R., Watson, D., Ring, P., Bryce, C.

(2014)

Pension Confusion, Uncertainty and Trust in Scotland: An Empirical Analysis,

in Journal of Social Policy

43

(03)

pp. 595-613

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Cook, S., Watson, D., Parker, L.

(2014)

New evidence on the importance of gender and asymmetry in the crime-unemployment relationship,

in Applied Economics

46

(2)

pp. 119-126

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Watson, D., Cook, S., Arico, F.

(2014)

Death of the pedagogue: pluralism and non-didacticism,

in International Journal of Pluralism and Economics Education

5

(3)

pp. 242-255

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Cook, S., Watson, D.

(2013)

Breaks and Convergence in U.S. Regional Crime Rates: Analysis of Their Presence and Implications,

in Social Sciences

2

(3)

pp. 180-190

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Parker, L., Watson, D., Webb, R.

(2011)

Family fortunes: Gender-based differences in the impact of employment and home characteristics on satisfaction levels,

in Journal of Socio-Economics

40

(3)

pp. 259-264

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Webb, R., Bryce, C., Watson, D.

(2010)

The effect of building society demutualisation on levels of efficiency at large UK commercial banks,

in Journal of Financial Regulation and Compliance

18

(4)

pp. 333-355

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Watson, D., Webb, R.

(2009)

Do Europeans View their Homes as Castles? Homeownership and Poverty Perception throughout Europe,

in Urban Studies

46

(9)

pp. 1787-1805

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Watson, D., Webb, R.

(2008)

Reservation wage levels in UK and German financial services sectors,

in The Service Industries Journal

28

(8)

pp. 1167-1182

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Brown, S., Sessions, J. G., Watson, D.

(2007)

The contribution of hour constraints to working poverty in Britain,

in Journal of Population Economics

20

(2)

pp. 445-463

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Watson, D., Johnson, S., Webb, R.

(2006)

Employer perceptions of skills deficiencies in the UK labour market: a subregional analysis,

in Environment and Planning A

38

(9)

pp. 1753-1771

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Watson, D., Webb, R., Johnson, S.

(2006)

Influence costs and the reporting of skill deficiencies,

in Human Relations

59

(1)

pp. 37-59

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Watson, D., Webb, R., Birdi, A.

(2004)

Coping with low pay: Cognitive dissonance and persistent disparate earnings profiles,

in Theory and Decision

57

(4)

pp. 367-378

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


Webb, R., Watson, D., Hinks, T.

(2003)

Testing for Wage Overpayment in UK Financial Services: A Stochastic Frontier Approach,

in The Service Industries Journal

23

(5)

pp. 123-136

Full Text UEA Repository

(Article)

(Published)


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Key Research Interests

Current Research Projects

  • Economics of Crime
  • Pension Provision
  • Home Ownership

Pedagogical Analysis

  • Pluralism in Economics
  • Widening Participation

Teaching Interests

Duncan teaches mainly in microeconomics.  His teaching philosophy focuses on how economic theory can be used to understand real world problems, ensuring that students fully recognise the riches of economics skills for employability. It is an approach that takes advantage of the innate multi-disciplinary nature of economics and mobilises this to vitalise student interest and to advertise the versatile power of economic models.

He has been recognised for his teaching at national level. In 2007 he won the UK Higher Education Academy Student Nomination Award. This is judged on the following criteria: inspire and encourage student interest in economics; challenge and motivate students towards academic excellence; enjoy and recognise the importance of working with students; and enhancing their education out of the classroom. In 2010 he also received a commendation in the UK Higher Education Academy Teaching Awards for Economics. The Awards’ panel described his nomination as “displaying all the qualities of commitment, enthusiasm, innovation and evident success that represent excellent teaching practice”. In 2015 he won a Student Union Innovative Teaching Award for creative and new ways of using technology and teaching methods.

Key Responsibilities

Duncan joined the School as Reader in Economics in 2012. His Academic, Teaching and Scholarship role was the first appointment of its kind at the University, with the School of Economics dedicated to further enhancing the student experience and continuing its prestigious teaching reputation.

He is the School's Director of Learning & Teaching Enhancement. Ensuring a leading management role in learning technology, he is focused on designing innovative programme provision capable of meeting the following criteria: responding to student evaluation; assisting employability aims; and adjusting provision according to the vibrant external opportunities that are created in Economics.