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The Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science (CBESS) was established in 2007 by the Faculty of Social Science at University of East Anglia.  The Centre's mission is to further the long tradition at UEA of using controlled laboratory and field experiments to study key questions in the social sciences, from foundational and methodological issues to applied research.

Together with our colleagues at the University of Nottingham and University of Warwick, we are founding members of the ESRC Network for Integrated Behavioural Science.

Researchers in CBESS are currently pursuing three main themes of research. The Preferences and Cognition cluster ask fundamental questions about how humans form judgments about uncertainty and values.  The Competition and Strategic Reasoning cluster investigate how individuals anticipate and react to actions of others, and solve tensions between competitive and cooperative incentives.  The Behaviour and Institutions cluster study how culture, society, and identity come together to influence how groups interact.

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New CBESS Working Paper

07/07/2017

 

Giving in Dictator Games - Experimenter demand effect or preference over the rules of the game? by Nadine Chlaß and Peter G. Moffatt

Abstract
Which preference underlies giving in dictator games? To date, the experimental evidence has either been interpreted as a preference over the distribution of pay-offs, or as an experimenter demand effect. We show that under strict dictator-dictator as well as strict dictator-recipient anonymity, giving in dictator games springs from a preference over the distribution of decision rights. In contrast, concerns which trigger experimenter demand (Andreoni and Bernheim 2009) are negatively correlated with dictator game giving. Our experiments cover a series of dictator game variants which have sparked the experimenter demand debate. In addition, we identify the sets of ethical ideals that dictators em-ploy to derive the ‘right’ course of action in a formal moral judgement test and model dictator transfers econometrically by means of dictators’ actual ethical ideals. Our results explain the lion’s share of results from the literature: lower transfers when dictators earn the pie (Cherry et al. 2002); lower transfers when ’take’ options are available (List 2007; Bardsley 2008); lower transfers when anonymity is lifted (Hoffmann et al. 1994); generous dictators consistently pre-ferring to avoid the game altogether, if given the option (Lazear et al. 2012), and findings that social norms and beliefs cause dictator transfers (Krupka and Weber 2013; Di Tella et al. 2015; Kimbrough and Vostroknutov 2015).


Contact Contact

For enquiries regarding the Centre, please contact the Director:

Dr Anders Poulsen
Director, Centre for Behavioural and Experimental Social Science
School of Economics
University of East Anglia
Norwich Research Park
Norwich NR4 7TJ
United Kingdom

Email: A.Poulsen@uea.ac.uk
Phone: +44 (0) 1603 591066

 

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